30 Year Anniversary: Publication About CAD – Curriculum Architecture Design

Via a Group Process

Which is how I prefer to approach analysi, design and even then development.

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CAD – Training Mag – 1984 – 6 page PDF – the first publication about Curriculum Architecture Design via a Group Process – published in Training Magazine in September 1984.

Original manuscript (30 pages) – How to Build a Training Structure That Won’t Keep Burning Down.

Since Then

I’ve been doing CAD efforts – to produce modular paths and menus and roadmaps of curricula since 1982.

I’ve myself have done 75 to date.

My business partners, staff and clients have done thousands more.

The last one I did started in December 2012 – and ended in mid-January 2013 – less than 60 days in total cycle time.

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Monday Morning Quarter PACT #16

Take a Quarter Hour or Less

To develop your ability to adopt and adapt the PACT Processes for ISD – to meet your Requirements and Constraints.

For Performance Improvement and positive ROI when properly targeted.

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C1- Curriculum Architecture Design Is…

Video Short C1- Curriculum Architecture Design Is…

Reminder – this is just one video of a collection of over 55 free “School of PACT” videos, that in combination with free books, articles, presentations and for fee books intends to enable the practice of performance-based Instructional Systems Design. To improve Performance Competence at the worker level, the work level, and the workplace level. For Individual, Process and Organizational performance improvement.

You may view them in sequence – or bounce around to eventually do just some or all of them.

See the Resource Tab or The Pursuing Performance Blog and the EPPIC Web Site for additional free resources – here.

See the entire School of PACT video collection Index – here.

What is PACT?

PACT is performance-based ISD… at 3 levels… with common analysis and project management approaches, tools and techniques… to speed the ISD process… to be effective while being efficient…

PACT Logo w 5 Methodologies 2

Other PACT Resources

See all of the EPPIC Videos on YouTube – here.

Books for free – here.

Books for sale – here.

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This MMQP Series

This Blog series will post each Monday at 8 am east coast time (USA).

Gopher-perched-transparent

Go for it – here – Monday Mornings!

Why PACT?

The benefits?

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Proven.

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Monday Morning Quarter PACT #15

Take a Quarter Hour or Less

To develop your ability to adopt and adapt the PACT Processes for ISD – to meet your Requirements and Constraints.

For Performance Improvement and positive ROI when properly targeted.

Slide1

B8- Analysis of Management

Video Shorts B8- Analysis of Management – 8:06 minutes

Reminder – this is just one video of a collection of over 55 free “School of PACT” videos, that in combination with free books, articles, presentations and for fee books intends to enable the practice of performance-based Instructional Systems Design. To improve Performance Competence at the worker level, the work level, and the workplace level. For Individual, Process and Organizational performance improvement.

You may view them in sequence – or bounce around to eventually do just some or all of them.

See the Resource Tab or The Pursuing Performance Blog and the EPPIC Web Site for additional free resources – here.

See the entire School of PACT video collection Index – here.

What is PACT?

PACT is performance-based ISD… at 3 levels… with common analysis and project management approaches, tools and techniques… to speed the ISD process… to be effective while being efficient…

PACT Logo w 5 Methodologies 2

Other PACT Resources

See all of the EPPIC Videos on YouTube – here.

Books for free – here.

Books for sale – here.

Slide3

This MMQP Series

This Blog series will post each Monday at 8 am east coast time (USA).

Gopher-perched-transparent

Go for it – here – Monday Mornings!

Why PACT?

The benefits?

Slide40

Proven.

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The 5 P’s of Planning

Just Plan It! Then Do It!

Instead of: Just Do It!

Unless it really is that easy – and the consequences for not planning are nil.

5-ps-of-planning

There is also The 6 P’s of Planning.

But that’s simply a slightly vulgar version of the 5 P’s version.

And recall Ike’s words of wisdom:

“Plans are nothing. Planning is everything.”

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ROI Is Mostly Affected By The Targeting Before ADDIE Starts

Or SAM. If ADDIE is not your thing.

My thing is an ADDIE-like MCD. More on that in a moment.

It’s Too Late Baby

By the time an ADDIE or SAM or SAT or some other ISD model starts – the ROI potential or not – is pretty much set. If there is nil or none or negative – that’s not something a stellar ADDIE effort can impact for improvement.

Yes – you can screw up in the ADDIE process after Targeting – and miss the Potential. But the Potential Improvement and it’s value – the R in ROI- is a matter of the existing situation – the current state compared to the best possible (not impossible) future state.

That’s the possible R in the ROI equation.

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You can screw up the Implementation – the delivery or access of the learning content – or Performance Support – by making it unpleasant and/or different from other Learning experiences of the Learners.

You can screw up the Development effort – and rely too much on one SME – when the research shows that they will miss up to 70% of what a novice needs to know and be able to do. Ya better test that stuff – don’t you know.

You can screw up the Design effort – and feed ‘em with a firehose, and not chunk, sequence and reinforce to the needed levels.

You can screw up the Analysis effort – by focusing on topics versus tasks – and by task I mean task-sets within a process – and not focusing on the outputs or products of behavior and cognition – of the individual and/or the team. Too often the focus is on Topics and not Tasks. And sometimes the focus is on narrow Tasks without the big picture of upstream and downstream and not of all Stakeholders but just on the Customer.

Bottom Line

My point is – quit worrying about the ROI of something you didn’t target in the first place. 

Focus on Transfer – by making sure your Analysis uncovers the authentic performance requirements and situational variables – the Performance Context.

It’s not about Learning. It’s about Performance. Even in a Learning Organization.

My MCD

This is my ADDIE equivalent.

MCD - POTs

I address this Targeting up-front in Project Planning & Kick-Off – and at each GRM – Gate Review Meeting – at the end of 4 of the 6 Phases of MCD. See the up-side-down Traffic lights in the graphic above (Go Lights). Where the targeting and mid-course decisions are given a GO (or not).

MCD is covered in both of the following books.

This book from 1999…

1999 lean-ISD Book Cover

And this book – from 2011…

2011 d Pb MCD

See the Resource Tab for PACT Resources – including books – both FREE and FOR A FEE.

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Five Grand – If You Can Meet the Learning Styles Challenge

The Learning Styles Challenge

The Learning Styles Challenge payout has recently been increased from $1000 to $5000!

That is, if any person or group creates a real-world learning intervention that takes learning styles into account–and proves that such an intervention produces better learning results than a non-learning-styles intervention, they’ll be awarded $5,000!

LS Challenge 5k

From Will Thalheimer’s Blog

Special thanks to the new set of underwriters, each willing to put $1000 in jeopardy to help get the word out to the field:

Learning Styles Challenge Rules

We’re still using the original rules, as established back in 2006. Read them here.


What is Implied in This Debunking

The basic finding in the research is that learning interventions that take into account learning styles do no better than learning interventions that do not take learning styles into account. This does not mean that people do not have differences in the way they learn. It just means that designing with learning styles in mind is unlikely to produce benefits–and thus the extra costs are not likely to be a good investment.

Interestingly, there are learning differences that do matter! For example, if we really want to get benefits from individual differences, we should consider the knowledge and skill level of our learners.


What Can You Do to Spread the Word

Thanks to multiple efforts by many people over the years to lessen the irrational exuberance of the learning-styles proliferators, fewer and fewer folks in the learning field are falling prey to the learning-styles myth. But the work is not done yet. This issue still needs your help!

Here’s some ideas for how you can help:

  • Spread the word through social media! Blogs, Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook!
  • Share this information with your work colleagues, fellow students, etc.
  • Gently challenge those who proselytize learning styles.
  • Share the research cited below.


History of the Learning Styles Challenge

It has been exactly eight years since I wrote in a blog post:

I will give $1000 (US dollars) to the first person or group who can prove that taking learning styles into account in designing instruction can produce meaningful learning benefits.

Eight years is a long time. Since that time, over one billion babies have been born, 72 billion metric tons of carbon pollution have been produced, and the U.S. Congress has completely stopped functioning.

However, not once in these past eight years has any person or group collected on the Learning Styles challenge. Not once!


Research on Learning Styles

However, since 2006, more and more people have discovered that learning styles are unlikely to be an effective way to design instruction.

First, there was the stunning research review in the top-tier scientific journal, Psychological Science in the Public Interest:

Pashler, H., McDaniel, M., Rohrer, D., & Bjork, R. (2008). Learning styles: Concepts and evidence. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 9(3), 105-119.

The authors wrote the following:

We conclude therefore, that at present, there is no adequate evidence base to justify incorporating learning-styles assessments into general educational practice. Thus, limited education resources would better be devoted to adopting other educational practices that have a strong evidence base, of which there are an increasing number. However, given the lack of methodologically sound studies of learning styles, it would be an error to conclude that all possible versions of learning styles have been tested and found wanting; many have simply not been tested at all. (p. 105)

To read more about what they wrote, click here.

Two years later, two of the authors reiterated their findings in a separate–and nicely written–article for the Association for the Study of Medical Education. You can access that article at:http://uweb.cas.usf.edu/~drohrer/pdfs/Rohrer&Pashler2012MedEd.pdf. Here’s the research citation:

Rohrer, D., & Pashler, H. (2012). Learning styles: Where’s the evidence? Medical Education, 46(7), 634-635.

A researcher who had once advocated for learning styles did an about face after he did some additional research:

Cook, D. A. (2012). Revisiting cognitive and learning styles in computer-assisted instruction: Not so useful after all. Academic Medicine, 87(6), 778-784.
Of course, not everyone is willing to give up on learning styles. For example, Furnham (2012) wrote:
The application of, and research into, learning styles and approaches is clearly alive and well. (p. 77).
Furnham, A. (2012). Learning styles and approaches to learning. In K. R. Harris, S. Graham, T. Urdan, S. Graham, J. M. Royer, & M. Zeidner (Eds.), APA handbooks in psychology. APA educational psychology handbook, Vol. 2. Individual differences and cultural and contextual factors (pp. 59-81). doi:10.1037/13274-003

A quick cursory look–today–through the PsycINFO database shows that scientific published articles on learning styles are still being published.

Learning Styles in the Workplace Learning Field

Guy Wallace, performance analyst and instructional architect, has been doing a great job keeping the workplace learning field up on the learning-styles debate. Check out his article in eLearn Magazine and his blog post update.

You’ll note from Guy’s blog post that many prominent thought leaders in the field have been suspicious of learning styles for many years.

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Will’s post is – here.

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