Systematically Conducting the Analysis and Design for Management Development Learning Paths

The Game Plan was to conduct Performance Analysis and the Curriculum Architecture Design on two levels of management, and then continue up the chain and do the next two while simultaneously moving across to another Department and doing the same for the first two levels of management. This was going to be performance-based Management and Leadership Development. This was being done for the Norfolk Naval Shipyard – run by NAVSEA on behalf of the US Navy.

We started in the Production Department…

We used the Management Areas of Performance Model to frame the analysis of performance competence requirements…

You’d need to start seeing the patterns of process performance across all of the organizational entities of the Enterprise; something such as the graphic below might suggest…

 

A common framework that reflects PROCESS PERFORMANCE and not Competencies – which are simply enablers. Without understanding the performance context – specifically for each target audience with a different context – it was unlikely that any Instructional/Learning Solutions would actually impact performance in the desired manner. If the content is not “authentic enough” – it will not develop new knowledge and skills. It will be a waste – as they say. Not totally. Only about 85% – because about 15% can learn out of context and apply in another context. Such as their job.

Does most of your management and leadership development focus on the authentic contexts of your managers and leaders?

The Performance data then informed the deriving of the enabling knowledge/skills, using almost all of the 17 K/S Categories of PACT…

The Path for the Supervisor…

The Path for the Zone Manager…

Although the US Navy ran out of funding due to the war efforts – the data remains to pick up this effort in the future and continue on the Path to Performance-based Development.

 

The PACT methods have been applied to dozens and dozens of management positions over the years – by Guy, his staff and associates – and by the client staff he has developed formally and informally over the years as well.

This methodology is described in my book: lean-ISD – available here as a 410 page PDF.

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2 comments on “Systematically Conducting the Analysis and Design for Management Development Learning Paths

  1. Pingback: HPT Video 2020 – Jonathan White | EPPIC - Pursuing Performance

  2. Pingback: Revisiting a Curriculum Architecture Design Project From 2003 | EPPIC - Pursuing Performance

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