Today – November 1 – Marks My 30th Year As a Consultant

November 1, 1982  – November 1, 2012 

I left Motorola’s Training & Education Center (MTEC) in October 1982 and joined Ray A. Svenson and my (then) wife Karen Kennedy Wallace in Ray’s firm: R. A. Svenson & Associates.

My Business Card from 1982…

On that first day in the new world, I flew with Ray to Houston and my first official client engagement – with Exxon. That was after getting my insurance ducks in a row.

But before we did that, I co-delivered a session with Ray to the local NSPI Chapter (now ISPI). The topic was “Group Process for Job Modeling” – with a methodology I had helped Karen and Ray with before I left Motorola. I helped them define the process and outputs for Analysis and then I created the first Curriculum Architecture Design using the analysis data they brought back from a group meeting – that I now call the Analysis Team meeting.

Before PDAs we used a thing called paper calendars…like this one…

So – 30 Years Later

My specialty became CADs – Curriculum Architecture Designs – creating paths of modular Events (Courses, CBTs, readings, structured interviews, etc., etc.) that could be ReUsed at the Event or Lesson or Instructional Activity levels.

CADs then lead to multiple MCD efforts.

Just as architecting a house leads to building it.

MCD – is my version of ADDIE – used on hundreds of projects – with predictability for costs and schedules.

It took me almost 20 years to write my book about that: lean-ISD – which I started right as I was leaving MTEC.

lean-ISD Book Quotes – from 1999

Geary A. Rummler, from the Performance Design Lab says, “If you want to ground your fantasy of a ‘corporate university’ with the reality of a sound ‘engineering’ approach to instructional systems that will provide results, you should learn about the PACT Processes. If you are the leader of, or a serious participant in, the design and implementation of a large-scale corporate curriculum, then this book is for you. This system could be the difference between achieving bottom-line results with your training or being just another ‘little red school house.’ ”

Dale Brethower, Ph.D. from Western Michigan University says, “This book is not an easy read, it is something much better. It is a book written for people who share Guy Wallace’s passion for developing training that adds value, for people who are so committed to competence for themselves and the people they serve that they are willing to do what it takes to develop training that adds value. The best way to use the book is as a guide in doing projects . . . it describes the why and the what and offers many wise and useful suggestions about how.”

Jim Russell, Professor of Instructional Design at Purdue University says, “This highly structured and detailed process for instructional design provides excellent guidelines for advanced students and practitioners. The focus is on improving training and development processes and products in business and industry.”

John Swinney, from Bandag, Inc. and president of ISPI says, “Guy Wallace is giving away the magic. This book provides a model and methodology to help a training function link its long-term outputs to the business needs of the organization. The PACT Processes help introduce the voice of the customer into any training organization whose mission is to improve performance.”

Miki Lane, senior partner at MVM The Communications Group says, “lean-ISD takes all of the theory, books, courses, and pseudo job aids that are currently on the market about Instructional Systems Design and blows them out of the water. Previous ‘systems’ approach books showed a lot of big boxes and diagrams, which were supposed to help the reader become proficient in the design process. Here is a book that actually includes all of the information that fell through the cracks of other ISD training materials and shows you the way to actually get from one step to another. Guy adds all of the caveats and tips he has learned in more than 20 years of ISD practice and sprinkles them as job aids and stories throughout the book. However, the most critical part of the book for me was that Guy included the project and people management elements of ISD in the book. Too often, ISD models and materials forget that we are working with real people in getting the work done. This book helps explain and illustrate best practices in ensuring success in ISD projects.

Randy Kohout, director of knowledge management at Fireman’s Fund says, “I’ve found lean-ISD to be a very useful reference tool and resource. After having been involved with Guy Wallace on a large-scale application of the methodology at my last firm, I’ve taken on several recent projects in my new company using many of the methods, tools, and templates of Guy Wallace’s PACT Processes for Training & Development. The book is designed so that I was able to quickly access the information I needed to provide my clients with practical, timely, and quality approaches to tackling their business issues. I highly recommend this book as a guide for business professionals challenged by either training and development, learning, knowledge management, or human competence development projects.”

Then 12 Years Later

Then that book and 2 others were reconfigured into this PACT 6 Pack.

CADs – Became My Speciality

Producing T&D Paths – based on a rigorous but quick analysis effort.

Here is a listing – on the next 3 graphics – of my clients and the Target Audience – since 1982.

More of my CAD Experience…

More of my CAD Experience…

I am now working on my 75th CAD effort.

I’ve done over 50 MCD (ADDIE-like) efforts, designed and developed other HR-Talent Management Systems including recruiting/selection systems and tools, career development paths, performance appraisal systems and tools, and performance-based certification/qualification systems and performance tests.

Clients   

(#of Projects)

  • Abbott Laboratories (3)
  • ALCOA (2)
  • ALCOA Labs (2)
  • Alyeska Pipeline Services Company (2)
  • American Management Systems (1)
  • Ameritech (1)
  • Amoco Corporation (13)
  • Arthur Andersen (1)
  • ARCO of Alaska (3)
  • AT&T (4)
  • AT&T Communications (1)
  • AT&T Microelectronics (1)
  • AT&T Network Systems (24)
  • Bandag (7)
  • Bank of America (2)
  • Baxter (1)
  • Bellcore Tech (1)
  • British Petroleum-America (1)
  • Burroughs (1)
  • Channel Gas Industries/Tenneco (1)
  • Commerce Clearing House (1)
  • Data General (1)
  • Detroit Ball Bearing (1)
  • Digital Equipment Corporation (2)
  • Discover Card (1)
  • Dow Chemical (3)
  • EDS (1)
  • Eli Lilly (7)
  • Exxon Exploration (2)
  • Fireman’s Fund Insurance (1)
  • Ford Design Institute (1)
  • Ford Motor Company (1)
  • General Dynamics (10)
  • General Motors (25)
  • GTE (1)
  • H&R Block (1)
  • Hewlett Packard (5)
  • Illinois Bell (3)
  • Imperial Bondware (1)
  • Imperial Oil (1)
  • Johnson Controls (1)
  • Kodak (1)
  • Lockheed (1)
  • MCC Powers (16)
  • Motorola (1)
  • Multigraphics (1)
  • NASA (1)
  • NASCO (1)
  • NAVAIR (1)
  • NAVSEA (2)
  • NCR (2)
  • Norfolk Naval Shipyard (4)
  • Northern Telecom (1)
  • Northern Trust Bank (1)
  • NOVA (2)
  • Novacor (1)
  • NSA (1)
  • Occidental Petroleum Labs (1)
  • Opel (1)
  • Pacific Gas & Electric (1)
  • Quaker (1)
  • Siemens Building Technologies (1)
  • Spartan Stores (1)
  • Sphinx Pharmaceuticals (1)
  • Square D Company (2)
  • SunTrust Banks (2)
  • Valuemetrics (1)
  • Verizon (3)
  • Verizon Information Services (1)
  • Wells Fargo Advisors (1)
  • Westinghouse Defense Electronics (1)

Links to Over 250 Short “Project Overviews” – organized by Client Name

Short Project Overviews including project titles, year conducted.

11 Project Case Studies

Are located here.

These include award winning projects with AT&T (1986), General Motors (1998), Hewlett-Packard (2002), Imperial Oil (199X), and Siemens (1999).

The Key For Me Has Always Been the MPs

MPs – Master Performers.

Leverage them.

May I Assist You and Your Master Performers?

guy.wallace@eppic.biz

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