T&D: Book-Ending Ryan Tracey’s Generic Content

In Response to Ryan Tracey’s Recent Post

His excellent post:

The foundations of innovation in L&D

From Ryan…

The 70

From the get-go, a false idol that must fall is the belief that the role of the L&D department is to create all the training to meet the organisation’s learning needs. These needs are so diverse within and across all the different job roles that the task is an almost comical impossibility.

Moreover, a large proportion of these needs is generic; despite what many organisations think, they’re not that special. Analytics is analytics. Decision making is decision making. Difficult conversations are difficult conversations. The nature of such content is universal.

So my first building block is a third-party content library. There are many players in this space, and sure it makes sense to pick one that matches your organisation’s profile, but their pedagogical purpose is the same: to provide your people with immediate access to an extensive suite of learning assets, covering a broad range of topics, on demand. Such a resource empowers self-directed learning which, in the language of 70:20:10, can be done on the job, just in time.

Another false idol to fall is the myth that all the information we need is at our fingertips. Clearly, not all our needs are generic. The organisation is special in the sense that has its own products, processes, systems, policies, etc, which a third party will never cover.

So my second building block is an in-house knowledge base. Whether the underlying technology is an intranet, CMS or wiki, again the pedagogical purpose is the same: to provide your people with on-demand access to bespoke content that improves performance.

I agree. And…

Book-End ‘Em Danno

To paraphrase a popular line from the TV series: Hawaii Five-0: Book-End Em!

This – in the next graphic – is my framework – the 5 Tier Inventory Framework – from the early 1990s – for doing what Ryan suggest when he writes:

So my second building block is an in-house knowledge base. Whether the underlying technology is an intranet, CMS or wiki, again the pedagogical purpose is the same: to provide your people with on-demand access to bespoke content that improves performance.

Slide1

Because Without the Book-Ends Most May Struggle

Not everyone sees equally how to apply – with nuanced adaptations – in their Context – or Contexts.

How can we help ’em – because we’ve got that Empathy thing going – Empathy for the Enterprise who wants Performance Capability … and Empathy the learner/Performer who wants Performance Capability too … how can we do more than Empathise?

And – How can we ensure that authentic, performance-based

Practice with Feedback is available – when needed?

Part of my ISD approach… I label as ReUse… via the…

5 Tier Inventory Framework

The 5 Tier Inventory Framework – for organizing (Architecting) and warehousing all of the Enterprise Content in at and above and below the “Learning Object” manner …

Tier 1 Houses all of the Orientations, such as “Welcome to the Enterprise, here’s what we do and with whom downstream & upstream” – and, “Welcome to the Function, here’s what we do and with whom downstream & upstream” – and “Welcome to the Department, here’s what we do and with whom downstream & upstream” – and repeat for the Business Units/Divisions, Teams and Jobs, etc. Plus “Here’s our Value Chains and Our Marketplaces”

Tier 2– Houses a very special set of Advanced Organizers – the demystifications of “a Job’s” – a unique target Audience’s unique and shared Areas of Performance (a.k.a.: Key Results Areas, Process Blocks, Major Duties, Accomplishments). This is the front-end of the 2 bookends of generic content, such as Active Listening – or in Ryan’s examples: Analytics, Decision Making, Difficult Conversations.

However, I might adapt his sentence “The nature of such content is universal” – to – “The core concepts of such content is universal – but the applications are most often not.

Tier 3– Houses the generic Content – even if built/bought for a specific Target Audience.

If bought – you get what you pay for.

If designed following my PACT Processes’ MCD/IAD methods, the content would be designed and then developed “in anticipation” of the future needs to easily and cost-effectively share – either “as is” or “after modification.” The design is ideally robust to those future needs – which can be done more easily if built vs bought.

If bought – unless you have the legal license to modify – to take out the specifics and displace them with your language, models, etc. – you have to address THAT in your book-ends. If you have the legal license to modify you do that to reduce efforts and costs for future ReUse.

Slide44

Tier 4– Houses the shared – across more than 1 Target Audience – “How To” Perform content – that way toooooooooooooooooooo many Learning Programs/Training Programs don’t ever include. THIS is where the Practice with Feedback happens.

Examples of Content include: System Login, Coordinating Travel, Expense Reimbursement, Preparing & Running & Following Up Meetings, Building Performance Support, Ordering Capital Equipment, Conducting the Annual Strategic Planning Exercise, etc., etc.

Tier 5–  Houses the unique – to 1 Target Audience – “How To” Perform content – that way toooooooooooooooooooo many Learning Programs/Training Programs also don’t ever include. THIS is also where the Practice with Feedback happens.

Examples of Content include: Conducting Instructional Analysis Efforts, Conducting Instructional Design Efforts, Preparing the Sales Proposal, Conducting Monthly Maintenance on the Building HVAC Systems, etc., etc.

What “Tier” content is going to go into is decided during the Design Team Meeting – when the Analysis data is processed in the PACT Processes for T&D “Design Processes” for CAD, MCD or IAD.

Slide45

 

Clark Quinn on Context

In “Understanding the Importance of Context in Your Learning Solutions” Clark writes:

Among the findings in learning is that learning is better when done in context. You may have heard that you should study in the room you’re going to be tested in. In short, if you learn in a context like the one you have to perform in, your performance will be better. If you want people to be able to do new things, you have to put them in a situation to perform the new thing, and give them a chance to practice. That’s what a designed learning experience is. But there is a lot going on here.

Do Abstracts Work?

Abstract learning doesn’t transfer to other situations. You might think that learning in the abstract gives you the flexibility to transfer to other situations, but it doesn’t work that way. What you get is the ability to perform on abstract problems, but not to apply it in particular contexts. It just doesn’t get activated. You can’t get good performance from abstract problems. (See: too much of what happens in school.)

Yes – I’ll Have Numerous Versions of Active Listening

But only for the Critical Target Audiences – which I label PUSH (versus PULL).

I might have an Active Listening set of modular content for each PUSH Target Audience.

Slide11

The PULL target Audiences – those who are not critical, or who are but their turn hasn’t come up yet – will have to suffice with the Generic Content residing/housed in Tier 3.

Life is like that.

Life Like That

And Life Like That – will require an organizing scheme, and a numbering scheme for original content and all derivations required. And all past content as well as current.

I didn’t suggest that this would be easy. It’s inherently complex.

But if you need someone to empathise with you regarding your plight/ your complexity – I suggest that you talk to someone in charge of your own Enterprise’s Product & Services – and discuss their BOMs (Bills of Materials) and inventory systems and schemes, with them.

Then you won’t feel so lonely.

And you might see a way to share what they use to get on top of all of this – and stay on top of all of this.

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