The Upsides & Downsides of Working Virtually

High Tech Needs High Touch

Another Balance needed…

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Pros…

From…

With all the modern comforts of home beckoning for our attention, it would be understandable if remote workers saw a dip in productivity, yet the opposite is true. According to the Airtasker study, telecommuters “worked 1.4 more days every month, or 16.8 more days every year” than people who worked in an office.

Researchers found that, along with spending more time doing work, remote employees lost 27 minutes per day on distractions, as opposed to the 37 minutes distracted office workers lost. The survey also found that just 8% of remote employees and 6% of office workers reported finding it hard to focus on their tasks. Researchers also found that office workers took shorter breaks than remote workers, though longer breaks have been shown to increase productivity.

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Cons…

From…

It’s not just the isolation. Working from home has surprising downsides – The Conversation

It’s not just isolation and loneliness.

Research shows working from home is far worse for team cohesion and innovation than working in the office.

In 2013 Yahoo chief executive Marissa Meyer banned working from home, saying that in order “to become the absolute best place to work, communication and collaboration will be important, so we need to be working side-by-side. That is why it is critical that we are all present in our offices.”

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Mixed…

From…

When Working From Home Doesn’t Work – The Atlantic

If it’s personal productivity—how many sales you close or customer complaints you handle—then the research, on balance, suggests that it’s probably better to let people work where and when they want. For jobs that mainly require interactions with clients (consultant, insurance salesman) or don’t require much interaction at all (columnist), the office has little to offer besides interruption.

But other types of work hinge on what might be called “collaborative efficiency”—the speed at which a group successfully solves a problem. And distance seems to drag collaborative efficiency down. Why? The short answer is that collaboration requires communication. And the communications technology offering the fastest, cheapest, and highest-bandwidth connection is—for the moment, anyway—still the office.

Recognize Your Potential Need to Balance Your Situation

As Buzz says…

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