The Transition From Individual Contributor to Manager in ISD/LXD

Those in ISD/LXD would want to move into management should assess their current state of readiness, based on the knowledge and skills required of a Design Manager in their current enterprise, or in general.

The knowledge and skills required of a Design Manager and has to do with both Design knowledge/skills, and non-Design, managerial knowledge/skills.

Those knowledge and skills required, help form the criteria that both should be “hired for” – and those to be assessed for “the potential for being developed.”

I addressed this a bit in my 2011 book: The Curriculum Manager’s Handbook – based on the L-C-S Framework my firm created in ’94 which was based on over 20 ISD Analysis efforts for management populations.

We had been helping our clients redesign their Training functions as a result of my partner’s (the late Ray Svenson) Strategic Planning consulting engagements to reflect the processes “owned” by that function, and the other Enterprise processes the manager (and staff) had to also engage in.

My role was typically to help our clients redefine their ISD processes and then develop T&D Plans for the staff – and sometimes to facilitate that development.

We “framed” the Areas of Performance (AoPs) Competence as a starting point for determining the specific knowledge and skills and Performance Competencies – that reflected their Processes and Practices.

My Process framework for a T&D function was first published in my book, T&D Systems View (2001).

The L-C-S framework was first published in our 1994 book: The Quality Roadmap.

The Curriculum Manager’s Handbook was published in 2011.

A Design Manager’s Design knowledge and skills would come to play in affecting their tasks and outputs in all of the AoPs in our model – but primarily in C1-2-3 and S1.

See all 17 of my books on my Amazon Authors Page: https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B08JQC4C4V

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