Weekend Reflections

A Trifecta for the Week

On Thursday I drove down the mountain to Charlotte NC to spend some time with Clark Quinn, PhD, before his session with my local ISPI Charlotte chapter. I had recruited him as one of our speakers last August.

He was gracious enough to also sit with me for one of my HPT Video interviews – here –  where I try to bring out the backgrounds and current thinking of key practitioners in the HPT Space – where their practice is informed by the research. I want to know about “how they got to where they are, and what and who influenced them on their journey.”

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I’ve been trying to think who else in my professional past has been able to reference so many influences and sources so readily as Clark did as he reflected in response to my questions – and the closest I could come up to is Dale Brethower, PhD, who I served on the board under his presidency of ISPI in 1999-2000, and the late Don Tosti, PhD, who was the ISPI President-Elect when I served as President in 2003-2004. They both were always quoting the sources for their comments and positions.

I’ve spent 40 years in the performance-based T&D field and 37 of those as a consultant. I was never formally educated in our field but learned at the feet of my managers and peers and from the gurus I saw, heard from, and met, at NSPI Chapters starting in 1979, at NSPI Conferences – starting in 1980 and at Lakewood (Training Magazine) Conferences and ASTD Conferences, BPM Conferences and IEEE Conferences. I’ve read a few books over the decades too.

But the beat goes on. And I cannot, and you should not, simply rest on your laurels – so to speak.

To ‘rest on your laurels‘ means that you get lazy or complacent about what you could achieve because you’re too busy basking in the memories of former glories.

But I feel like such a slacker at times when I compare myself to some of those who I have recorded for my HPT Video series, such as Clark Quinn, and Jane Bozarth and Patti Shank – 3 of my most recent subjects – and who coincidentally were the subjects of a new video series that started this past Thursday in between my video session with Clark and his evening session at ISPI.

This new video series, Nerdy Shop Talk, started by Julie Dirksen (@usablelearning) and Tracy Parish (@Tracy_Parish), was titled The Research Rabbit Hole – and discussed what practitioners need to know from the research and the difficulties they might have – such as “questionable research” from the Predatory Journals out there. I suggest you check this out when you find yourself with an hour to invest  – here. And follow this on Twitter at: @nerdyshoptalk.

So I heard from Clark Quinn three times in one day – in addition to some chat at both lunch and dinner.

Stay Curious

As Clark offered when I asked him for any final words of wisdom for people new to the field in our video interview, he said, “Stay Curious.”

Good advise for all of us, in the pursuit of our own performance competence.

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My Thoughts on T&D – In Today’s Context

Too few – I am afraid – look to the authentic Performance Context, Outputs and their Measures, and their Tasks and their Measures. and the Enabling Knowledge/Skills – before developing or curating Content.

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That is a wasteful effort and that process needs re-engineering, IMO.

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HPT Video: Clark Quinn

Yesterday I sat with Clark Quinn, PhD, face-to-face for another of my HPT Video interviews. Dr. Quinn was in Charlotte NC to speak to our ISPI Charlotte chapter about “Beyond the Course – The Performance Ecosystem and the Future of L&D.”

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The video is 57:50 minutes in length.

From his website:

Clark Quinn, Ph.D., is a recognized leader in learning technology strategy, helping organizations take advantage of information systems to meet learning, knowledge, and performance needs. His approach is learning experience design, combining what we know about how people think and learn with comprehension of technology capabilities to meet real needs. He combines a deep background in cognitive science, a rich understanding of computer and network capabilities reinforced through practical application, considerable management experience, and a track record of strategic vision and successful innovations.

His interest in computers and learning started at UC San Diego where he designed his own major in Computer-Based Education, and was part of a research project using email for classroom discussion (in 1979!). Clark worked at DesignWare as an educational computer game designer and programmer before returning to UCSD to acquire a Ph.D in applied cognitive science. He subsequently conducted research at the Center for Research in Mathematics and Science Education at San Diego State University, and at the Learning Research and Development Center at the University of Pittsburgh.

Clark spent seven years in Australia advancing learning technology. At the University of New South Wales, he taught interaction design and researched and published on the design of engaging, effective, interactive learning environments. During his time in Australia he branched out and held the position of Multimedia Manager for Open Net and then served as Director of Education Technology for Access CMC, both initiatives of the Australian Government. He returned to California to take the position of Director of Cognitive Systems for Knowledge Universe Interactive Studio, where he built and led a team that developed an intelligently adaptive learning system.

Clark has been involved in the design, development, and/or evaluation of a wide variety of educational technology for over 30 years. Projects in which he has led design include educational games, mobile learning applications, performance support tools, online conferences, web-based learning, effectiveness evaluation methodologies, and adaptive systems. He keynotes both nationally and internationally, and is the author of numerous articles, chapters and four books.

Check out the sites for Clark’s books:

In 2012 he was awarded the eLearning Guild’s first Guild Master designation.

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From LinkedIn

Helping organizations ‘work smarter’ by leveraging technology in alignment with how we think, work, and learn. Demonstrated ability to lead the development of successful learning, performance, and knowledge solutions. Internationally recognized for strategy, innovation and problem-solving, combining a deep knowledge of human cognition with practical application to the design of advanced technology systems, augmented by business and management experience.

Specialties: Strategic learning/knowledge/performance analysis and the design of advanced system solutions, team leadership, client credibility, interaction and experience design, learning games, mobile learning, content models, intelligent system architecture, presentation and publication.

Clark Quinn at ISPI Charlotte March 14, 2019

Kicking his session off…

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Wrapping up…

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Check out Clark’s 5 books – here.

After his session 4 chapter members went out for a late dinner with Dr. Quinn.

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At dinner after the session, Clark Quinn, Guy Wallace, Don Kirkey, Gary DePaul and Kiran Budhrani.

Connect with Clark Quinn

You can follow Clark on Twitter: @Quinnovator

His LinkedIn Profile: linkedin.com/in/quinnovator

Websites
Email: clark@quinnovation.com

My HPT Video Series

The HPT Practitioner and HPT Legacy Video Series was started by me in 2008 as a means of sharing the diversity of HPT Practitioners, and the diversity of HPT Practices in the workplace and in academia. The full set of videos may be found and linked to – here.

HPT – Human Performance Technology – is the application of science – the “technology” part – for Performance Improvement. As the late Don Tosti noted, “All performance is a human endeavor.”

Whether your label for HPT is that, or Performance Improvement or Human Performance Improvement, it is all about Evidence Based Practices for Performance Improvement at the Individual level, the Team level, the Process level, the Department level, the Functional level, the Enterprise level, the Value Chain level, and at the level of Society/World.

HPT Practitioners operate at all of these levels, as this Video Series clearly demonstrates.

Although ISPI – the International Society for Performance Improvement is the home of many HPT Practitioners – the concepts, models, methods, tools and techniques are not limited to any one professional affinity group or professional label.

ISPI just happens to be where I learned about HPT – and has been my professional home since 1979.

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HPT Video Matinee with Bill Daniels

HPT Video Practitioner: Bill Daniels

This video was shot in 2011. It is 43:43 minutes in length.

This Video Matinee Series will be published on Tuesdays and Thursdays for the duration of 2019.

The HPT Practitioner and HPT Legacy Video Series was started by Guy W. Wallace in 2008 as a means of sharing the diversity of HPT Practitioners, and the diversity of HPT Practices in the workplace and in academia. The full set of videos may be found and linked to – here.

HPT – Human Performance Technology – is the application of science – the “technology” part – for Performance Improvement. As the late Don Tosti noted, “All performance is a human endeavor.”

Whether your label for HPT is that, or Performance Improvement or Human Performance Improvement, it is all about Evidence Based Practices for Performance Improvement at the Individual level, the Team level, the Process level, the Department level, the Functional level, the Enterprise level, and at the level of Society/World.

HPT Practitioners operate at all of these levels, as this Video Series clearly demonstrates.

Although ISPI – the International Society for Performance Improvement is the home of many HPT Practitioners – the concepts, models, methods, tools and techniques are not limited to any one professional affinity group or professional label.

ISPI just happens to be where I learned about HPT – and has been my professional home since 1979.

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T&D/PI: PACT and EPPI

Back in 2001

In 2001 I was working on finishing up my approach to Performance Improvement (PI). Those methods are known as EPPI – Enterprise Performance Improvement.

In 2001 I recorded a video of me talking about EPPI – but all but one of the video files disappeared when a hard drive crashed back in 2006 and attempts to  recover the many files on it was unsuccessful. All that I have from that video is the image of me in my CADDI Inc. offices in 2001, in the graphic below.

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I’d been working on the EPPI methods since the late 1980s – as my ISD Analysis methods (in PACT) attempted to uncover Performance Issues that sometimes could and sometimes could not be resolved by addressing Knowledge and Skills. My clients were not always in a position to tackle and resolve those issues – so they and their people needed to learn how to live with them – and minimize them as best they could.

In any event, my attitude has always been that it is a GOOD THING to give all learners/Performers a “heads up” about the barriers to performance that they will face, and how Master Performers avoid them in the first place, and what they do if they were unavoidable in the second place. Whether or not the Enterprise addressed the Performance Issue or not.

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My PACT Processes are a sub-set of my EPPI Processes. EPPI might take over an ISD effort after the Analysis phases of PACT – by design.

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In 2011 I updated several of my earlier books to address both ISD and PI.

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See my books on Amazon – here.

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